Michel Chion’s “Guide to Sound Objects: Pierre Schaeffer and Musical Research” (PDF)

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“Our ambition, with this Guide to Sound Objects, has always been to give researchers, musicians, music-lovers and all who are directly or indirectly interested in the sound-universe an unbiased, clear and dependable tool (if this can be done) for a better knowledge and understanding of Pierre Schaeffer’s considerable contribution to this field, by means of an inventory of the ideas and concepts developed in his most important work, the Traité des Objets Musicaux.”

Download PDF : Guide To Sound Objects

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Origins of the police

Works in theory

The Five Points district of lower Manhattan, painted by George Catlin in 1827. New York’s first free Black settlement, it became a mixed-race slum, home to Blacks and Irish alike, and a focal point for the stormy collective life of the new working class. Cops were invented to gain control over neighborhoods and populations like this. The Five Points district of lower Manhattan, painted by George Catlin in 1827. New York’s first free Black settlement, Five Points was also a destination for Irish immigrants and a focal point for the stormy collective life of the new working class. Cops were invented to gain control over neighborhoods and populations like this.

In England and the United States, the police were invented within the space of just a few decades—roughly from 1825 to 1855.

The new institution was not a response to an increase in crime, and it really didn’t lead to new methods for dealing with crime. The most common way for authorities to solve a crime, before and since the invention of police, has been for someone to tell them who did it.

Besides, crime has to do with the acts of individuals, and the ruling elites who invented the police were responding to challenges posed by collective…

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American Boxers Feared the Arrival of Muay Thai, 1936

Martial Arts New York

According to website of the Thai Boxing Association of the U.S.A., the history of Muay Thai in America began in 1968.

However, a number of vintage articles indicate that as early as 1936, Americans–specifically, New Yorkers–knew about the existence of Muay Thai–and feared its arrival on American shores.

The following article appeared in the Cortland Standard on April 21, 1936:

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The article is interesting not only for its illustration of the fact that Americans perceived Muay Thai as a threat to the dominance of their own pugilists, but also for the fact of Americans being so “impressed” by Thai styles that they wished to appropriate them.

Nearly two decades later, on June 15, 1950, the following article appeared in the Niagara Falls Gazette:

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One year after this article was published, a team of Thai boxers did indeed come to the United States.

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Early Muay Thai Kickboxing in America, 1952

Martial Arts New York

According to website of the Thai Boxing Association of the U.S.A., the history of Muay Thai in America began in 1968, when Ajarn Chai came to the United States. Chai, reputedly, was the first-ever Thai boxing instructor to teach Americans the art.

However, a number of vintage articles indicate that Thai boxing arrived at least a decade earlier in the United States, although it is not known if any of the visiting Thai pugilists taught the art as did Chai.

The following photograph appeared in the Register-Republic on October 29, 1952. An accompanying article noted:

“Thailand “boxers” really get a kick out of their version of the sport. Out in Seattle, Bancomong Chiaphat (right) wards off a hefty kick by Chaleim Amatayakul while fellow Thailander Woradheb Khoonwongse referees an exhibition match. The trio will tour the U.S. to show boxing fans how they do it in Thailand where anything—kicking, elbowing, kneeing, and…

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Margaret Atwood on Boxing

The moment when, after many years

of hard work and a long voyage

you stand in the centre of the ring,

bruised, half-lucid, smashed nose, eyes sealed, content,

knowing at last how you got there,

and say, I own this,

is the same moment when the fans unloose,

their soft arms form around you,

the media take back their language,

the posts fissure and collapse,

the air moves back from you like a wave

and you can’t breathe.

No, they whisper. You own nothing.

You were a visitor, pretender after pretender

climbing the ranks, planting the flag, proclaiming.

The title never belonged to you.

You never conquered the ring. 

It was always the other way round.